Joe Kulle and Katie Riley - Heritage Homes Real Estate



Posted by Joe Kulle and Katie Riley on 1/26/2020

If you intend to buy a house, you probably will check out a lot of home listings over the next few days and weeks. However, it is important to note that not all home listings are created equal, and how you analyze home listings may dictate your homebuying success.

Ultimately, there are several factors that homebuyers need to consider as they assess home listings, and these factors include:

1. Price

The price of a home is one of the key factors – if not the most important factor – that a homebuyer needs to consider in a home listing. Because if you ignore a home's price, you risk wasting precious time and resources as you pursue a home that falls outside your price range.

When it comes to buying a home, it pays to develop a budget ahead of time. That way, you'll know how much you can spend on a residence and can tailor your home search to fit your budget.

You may want to get pre-approved for a mortgage prior to looking at home listings as well. By doing so, you can enter the housing market with a budget in hand and explore available residences that won't force you to spend beyond your means.

2. Condition

Are you looking for a fixer-upper or a brand-new residence? Take a look at a home's condition, and you can determine whether a particular residence is right for you.

Oftentimes, a decades-old residence may require myriad upgrades. This means you may need to allocate significant time and resources to enhance the condition of an old house after you finalize your home purchase.

On the other hand, it is essential to remember that a new house may prove to be more expensive than an old residence. And if you're on the lookout for a bargain, you may want to shy away from listings for brand-new houses.

3. Features

Creating a list of must-have home features is ideal, as this will enable you to narrow your search for your dream residence.

For instance, if you want a home that has a big swimming pool, you can browse home listings accordingly. Or, if you would like to buy a house that is located near some of the nation's best schools, you can focus on home listings in cities and towns that feature top-rated schools.

If you want to streamline your home search, it usually helps to look beyond home listings. Fortunately, real estate agents are available to help you accelerate your search for the perfect residence.

A real estate agent understands the ins and outs of the housing market. He or she will learn about your homebuying goals and provide you with the latest home listings. Then, a real estate agent will work with you to simplify your home search and ensure that you can discover a terrific residence at an unbeatable price.

Take the guesswork out of reviewing home listings – use the aforementioned tips, and you can quickly evaluate a wide range of home listings and find your dream house.




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Posted by Joe Kulle and Katie Riley on 1/19/2020

Image by Gino Crescoli from Pixabay

The common understanding of an asset-based debt is a loan meant to be repaid with interest, over time, and backed by a physical asset such as a building or a car. The asset serves as collateral that can be claimed by the lender in case of borrower default.

An Asset-Based Security (ABS), however, in investment terminology, is somewhat different.

Even though the common understanding of an Asset-Backed Security (ABS) might be a loan that is based on an actual asset, such as a home or an automobile, that is only partially the case in investment terminology. By definition, the ABS represents a pool of debt -- usually a group of individual loans -- that can include any type of debt other than mortgages. It may include loans that are backed by real property, such as equipment, land, buildings, or business inventory, but not necessarily.

Mortgages are specifically excluded and classed separately today. The ABS evolved from the mortgage-backed securities that were first introduced in the 1980s, but a debt secured by a mortgage is today known as Collateralized Debt Obligation (CDO). To make it more confusing, a CDO is a specific type of ABS.

An ABS represents other types of debt. Liability might be associated with an automobile loan, student loan debt, credit card debt, home equity loan or other types of loan debt that are to be repaid, with interest, over a specified period of time. Investors in asset-based securities assume the risk; the anticipation is that payment of outstanding principal and interest will be repaid as scheduled, so that investors will earn a reasonable rate of return. The risk is that borrowers may default on the loans, or that a collection process will delay repayment and involve unexpected costs. 

The relative risk and anticipated return depends on the way such loans are packaged and sold. And the packaging depends in part on the reasons an original lender has for wanting to transfer the liability.

The original lender, often a small bank, credit union or other type of funding agency, will "sell the paper" as part of a package to a larger investor. This is accomplished in many ways and for a variety of reasons. Sometimes, it is to better the creditor's financial position or to comply with government rules regarding loan percentages and cash reserves. Such a sale may also be an attempt to dispose of non-performing loans by transferring the burden of collections to another entity. 

Investment institutions package loans based on risk assessment. The loans are separated into three classes known as tranches. Risk and potential return are proportional: A higher-risk tranch also promises higher yield, while lower risk invariably holds potential for a lower interest rate return on investment.

Working with a knowledgeable financial advisor is recommended if you are interested in ABS investing. Almost any brokerage firm can be used for such investment.  





Posted by Joe Kulle and Katie Riley on 1/16/2020


67 N. Water Street, East Bridgewater, MA 02333

Single-Family

$249,900
Price

9
Rooms
3
Beds
1
Baths
For that young family that wants to live in East Bridgewater. Located across from the Commercial Club! With a little work this truly is a great home. All natural wood work throughout the home. Nice level lot with an above ground pool. New hot water tank installed this past week. Low Down Payment call for details. Rehab money is available ask for details. Low, Low, Low down payment. Kick the landlord habit and own your own home today! This is a must see home not a drive by. And please give us a 24 hour notice.
Open House
No scheduled Open Houses

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Categories: Price Change  


Posted by Joe Kulle and Katie Riley on 1/12/2020

A home selling negotiation may seem like a major hassle, particularly for property sellers who want to find a buyer as soon as possible. Fortunately, a prepared home seller will be able to streamline the property selling cycle as well as get the best price for his or her residence.

What does it take to complete a successful home selling negotiation? Here are three must-haves that will ensure any home seller can finalize a successful negotiation quickly and effortlessly.

1. Housing Market Data

Understanding the ins and outs of the housing market can help an ordinary home seller become an exceptional one. As such, if you allocate the necessary time and resources to collect housing market data, you may be better equipped to enter a negotiation as an informed home seller.

Housing market data is readily available – you just need to know where to look for it.

For example, home sellers can examine the prices of recently sold houses that are similar to their own. By doing so, home sellers can see how their house stacks up against the competition – and whether the price a homebuyer wants for a residence is in line with similar properties.

2. Realistic Expectations

Let's face it – as much as a home seller would like to enjoy a fast, seamless negotiation with a property buyer, many hurdles may delay a home sale. But a home seller who establishes realistic expectations before a negotiation begins may be able to minimize stress.

For home sellers, it is important to understand that a negotiation must meet the needs of both a property buyer and seller. And if you consider the homebuyer's perspective, you may be able to enter a negotiation with an open mind.

Furthermore, a home seller should be unafraid to walk away from a negotiation if necessary. Although exiting a negotiation is far from ideal, it is important to remember that it is always an option. Thus, if a negotiation reaches a point where you start to feel uncomfortable, you can always walk away and relaunch your efforts to sell your house.

3. An Expert Real Estate Agent

No one should be forced to enter a home selling negotiation without expert assistance. Luckily, real estate agents are available in cities and towns nationwide, and these housing market professionals possess the skills and know-how to assist home sellers during negotiations.

An expert real estate agent will serve as a liaison between a home seller and homebuyer. He or she will provide honest, unbiased recommendations throughout each stage of a home selling negotiation, ensuring you can make informed decisions along the way. Perhaps best of all, a real estate agent is happy to respond to any home selling concerns and queries – without exception.

Want to take the guesswork out of negotiating a home sale? Consider the aforementioned factors before you begin a home selling negotiation, and you can improve your chances of securing the best price for your residence.





Posted by Joe Kulle and Katie Riley on 1/5/2020

There are a number of steps involved in buying a home. One of the many important things you should do before closing on a new home is to get the house properly inspected.

Buyers sometimes avoid getting a professional inspection for a number of reasons. Some are on a tight budget and want to save a few dollars. Others have time constraints and want to close as soon as possible. And, many buyers believe that omitting an inspection is a way to show trust in the previous owner.

In this article, we’ll talk about why getting a home inspection is such an important part before closing on a real estate deal.

Inspection costs

Closing on a home comes with a number of expenses. Application fees, origination fees, underwriting fees… the list goes on. If you’re buying a home, you might be tempted to opt out of getting the property inspected to save money.

The cost of an inspection ranges anywhere from $200 for smaller homes, to $400 or more for large homes. However, the cost of not getting your home inspected can be much greater. Even if you’re knowledgeable when it comes to houses, there are a number of things that only the experts can diagnose.

Having a professional inspect the home is the only way to ensure that there aren’t any issues that will come back to haunt you (and your wallet) in the months and years to come.

Saving time

Many buyers are eager to close the deal and begin moving into their new home as soon as possible. Sometimes buyers need to vacate their old home before a certain date, others try to time their move around holidays or school vacations.

There are other ways, however, to make sure you get the house inspected in time. First, make sure you’ve included a home inspection in your purchase agreement. This will avoid wasted times debating whether or not you are entitled to inspect the home.

Next, call multiple inspectors in your area for quotes and availability. Delaying this step can make you lose time, and inspectors might charge you more if they have to squeeze you into their schedule.

The best time to schedule an inspection is as soon as your offer is accepted.

Maintaining a good relationship with the seller

It may seem like an act of diplomacy to waive a home inspection. In reality, however, nearly all sellers will understand that you are simply doing due diligence to make sure the process runs smoothly for both of you.

Sellers might sometimes offer you the findings of a previous inspection that they had done. In this case, it’s still important to have your own inspection done so that you can walk through the home with the inspector and listen to their feedback. You can’t be sure of the accuracy of any old reports, and the previous inspector is only accountable to the seller.


Having a home professionally inspected is almost always a good idea. It can save you time and money in repairs that could have been avoided.





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