Joe Kulle and Katie Riley - Heritage Homes Real Estate



Posted by Joe Kulle and Katie Riley on 8/18/2019

If you’re a health nut, where you live may be a big factor for you. The neighborhood that you choose could have some impact on your health and lifestyle choices. Your neighborhood will need the amenities that you crave like places for exercise, access to healthy food, and sidewalks for walking. These aspects also add to the community sense that you feel within the neighborhood. Children’s parks, people who go on frequent strolls, and a sense of people spending time outside often are all signs of a “healthy” neighborhood. Below, we’ll delve into these key factors. 


Sidewalks And Bike Trails


Being able to do daily errands on foot along with access to easy outdoor exercise is important to a healthy lifestyle. These amenities provide safety and the ability to access what you need without a car. You can even find public transportation easier to get to and from. As a bonus, you’ll be doing something good for the environment, saving gas and staying out of traffic.  


Nature Is Abundant


Don’t underestimate how much healthier being around nature can make you feel. From lush trees, to parks, gardens, hiking trails, even golf courses all provide access to active activities and natural beauty. Even community gardens are a part of nature that can be good for your health. Having the opportunity to grow or even be around the inspiration of people growing and caring for their own food sources is good for you. The more access you have to nature in the place that you’re living, the healthier that you’ll be.  


Check Out The Social Scene


Sometimes you can get a sense of a neighborhood just by observing it. Are people making connections and out and about together, or do people seem to go off more on their own? Socializing is an important part of health and well-being. Some signs of socially friendly neighborhoods:


  • People are out walking their dogs, chatting
  • Neighbors are out together gathering in a front yard



Gyms And Healthy Food Are Readily Available


Do you see your favorite organic grocery store nearby? Having access to the type and quality of food you crave is important. Maybe there is an abundance of vegetarian and vegan restaurant options nearby. For those days that a workout outside just won’t do, having a gym close by is also a sign of a healthy neighborhood.    

 

Check Out The Traffic


A neighborhood can have all of the above, yet if it has a lot of traffic, you could have a huge issue. Lots of traffic brings two different kinds of pollution- noise and air. Not having access to quiet spaces can often increase stress levels. If you have allergies or asthma, being around a lot of traffic pollution may not help your condition much either. While traffic seems like a small detail, it’s something to consider when you’re looking for a healthy neighborhood.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Joe Kulle and Katie Riley on 8/11/2019

Trendy lofts evoke visions of converted warehouses filled with artists and musicians living and working in shared space, forgoing modern conveniences for Bohemian communal living. Modern lofts, however, have more to offer than exposed brick, industrial elevators, and visible pipes. In fact, the term “loft” might appear in marketing for anything from remodeled warehouses to revitalized historic apartment buildings and newly constructed high-rises in urban areas

The appeal of loft living

No one demographic has the corner on loft living. Young professionals look for proximity to work, nightlife, and recreation while empty-nesters want to reduce the requirements for upkeep, yard work, and maintenance. In both urban and smaller community downtown/uptown settings, loft-style housing offers easy access to shopping, medical care, theatres, and public transportation. When the distance from work to home to recreation and nightlife decreases, the opportunity to experience events and socialize with workmates and friends increases.

An advantage of live-work loft-style housing is the sense of camaraderie and shared interests with the other residents.

Choosing a loft style

With the growth in popularity of loft living, actual warehouse and commercial loft conversions cannot meet the demand. Industrial lofts no longer make up the bulk of loft offerings on the market. So-called “soft lofts”—new construction in the style of a converted loft—has all the modern amenities, energy-savings, and conveniences of other newly-built housing that replicates some features and atmosphere of traditional lofts. These newer buildings take advantage of lower cost utilities with energy-efficient windows, insulation, and heating and cooling systems. Many soft-lofts install surfaces made from recycled glass, wood, and plastic or use renewable resources.

Different from the completely open-concept industrial loft space, modern loft models have built-in closets and walled bedrooms but typically offer completely open living spaces, high windows, and even exposed ductwork to give the loft aesthetic.

Another type of “loft” is the revitalized historic building. Sometimes it’s a hotel past its glory days. It could be a former library or office building. Perhaps an aging residential building needed a new life. If living in a bit of history appeals to you, this type of loft should be on your list. Typically, much of the original architectural detail remains including marble columns with decorative capitals, soaring ceilings, marble or hardwood flooring, vintage elevators, leaded glass windows, and sweeping staircases. New to these buildings you’ll find upscale appliances set in gourmet kitchens, upgraded bathrooms, and secure entries. 

To learn about loft conversions or soft-loft buildings available in your area, contact a local real estate expert.




Tags: homebuyers   home trends  
Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Joe Kulle and Katie Riley on 8/4/2019

If you’ve never painted a home before, the term “cutting in” may be new to you, but to seasoned painters, it can either be your worst nightmare or your favorite part. Cutting in is a method of painting that eliminates most of the extensive prepping required when you follow all those painting instructions: remove all cover plates from light switches and power outlets; cover the floor with drop cloths, apply masking tape or painter’s tape around all the window and door trim, baseboards and crown molding! 

What it requires

The one item most necessary for learning the technique of cutting in is a steady hand. In addition to that you’ll need a good eye, and a really good brush. An angle brush is best because it makes sharper edges with thinner paint so there’s less chance of it running or dripping.

What Is It?

In the simplest terms, cutting in is freehand painting the straight lines along trim and other elements not slated for that paint color. If you can master it, you eliminate the need to mask everything off, so your job is completed that much faster.

What does it look like?

If your trim around your windows and doors, chair rail and crown molding is white and your wall will be green, you carefully paint a smooth line alongside the molding in your green paint, extending it out a couple inches so that when you roll the rest of the wall, your roller doesn’t need to come too close to the paint. The positives outweigh the negatives here:• Positives: Less time prepping; less time cleaning up and removing paint; reduced cost (the good tape is really expensive); instant gratification because you can see what it will look like right away, and the knowledge that you did it yourself.• Negatives: You’ll need to buy a really good brush; if you slip up and get a splotch of colorful paint on your white trim, it may take some extra effort to cover it up.

How to

Get yourself the best quality 1-1/2 inch to 2-inch angle brush you can afford, and a small can or paint tray that you can easily hold in one hand. Specialty “cut buckets” have no lip so it keeps paint from building up on the edge, but a plastic quart-sized container works just as well.

Practice painting with a piece of masking tape or paint guide until you can make a straight line the thickness you desire, and that doesn’t drip or run.

Now fill your bucket and get to work. Start in a location that has open access, such as a door or window in the middle of the wall. You want to build up your confidence before you get in one of those tight places.

Place the bristles at an angle and draw your brush down alongside the trim, breaking away from the edge every several inches until you feel sure of yourself. Keep a moist paper towel handy to quickly wipe off mistakes while the paint is still wet. Soon, you’ll have the whole room edged and ready to roll.

If you don’t think this technique is for you, ask your professional realtor for a referral of a qualified painter.




Categories: Uncategorized  


Posted by Joe Kulle and Katie Riley on 7/28/2019

For the most part, it’s safe to say we all know to come prepared when buying an older home. But did you know that the buying process of a new construction home comes with its own quirks? The customization and relationship with the builder through the process makes for a unique experience when buying a new construction home.

Here’s what you need to know:

Some developments have site registration policies. This means that they require you to come with your agent for at least the first couple visits. Don’t be caught off guard. When planning your viewings be prepared to work with your agent's schedule as well as your own.

Instead of asking to lower the cost ask when negotiating ask the builder to pay closing costs or to include upgrades. You’ll have an easier time getting a yes to these requests as builders don’t like to lower costs and gain a reputation for doing so in the process.

New construction homes aren’t a final product when purchasing. Because of this, it’s critical to get details on paper to protect yourself during the buying process. Details to include are how the home will be finished, any and all timelines, and what will happen if, for whatever reason, the home is not finished in time. Get all of this in writing to create a binding contract.

Ask questions! When touring the model house be sure to ask what comes standard and what is an upgrade. Get costs of upgrades that catch your eye so that you can plan your budget. When planning this budget you will also want to leave wiggle room as this will be a quote and not final cost. Your agent can help you create a list of common features that are standard and/or upgradable as well as ballpark costs.

Budget Tip: When deciding on upgrades know which are easier to have done during construction. Prioritize those over those that can easily be done after. Think upgrades that include wiring or getting into walls and ceiling for whatever reason.

New construction homes often come with a warranty. It’s important to know what this covers and what it doesn’t. Understand your cancellation rights and hire a real estate lawyer to review contracts and any important documents.  

Research the builder and if possible talk to other residents in the neighborhood. Ask them about their experience both during the buying process and living in the development afterward.

One thing that often catches home buyers off guard is when the builder requires you to get pre-approved by their lender even if you use your own lender. This is to safeguard themselves by ensuring you pass their lenders requirements for a safe investment. It’s also important to keep in mind that you may even get better rates and fees from the builder's lender.





Posted by Joe Kulle and Katie Riley on 7/25/2019

Once in a lifetime opportunity is yours to own this simple open concept beach cottage located on Bay Ave.. Perfect for 2, your back yard is the Cut River/Green Harbor where your boat awaits you on your own private mooring. All updates include new roof, siding, insulation, all electric wiring and box and total interior. Watch sunsets from the rear deck or catch the ocean breeze from the front brick patio, steps away from the beach. Great rental potential and no yard maintenance. This is a MUST SEE inside home and with summer upon us know if the time to buy. Easy to show! New Roof, siding and PVC Trim. All Furniture goes with the sale, all you need to do is show up and enjoy!

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